The Spring Equinox

On Nature

Last Saturday our (last) local farm celebrated the Spring Equinox by holding a Greenhouse Openhouse here in our seaside village. My family and I helped with the event, and had a good time observing the changing of the seasons. A couple of Celtic fiddlers played by the wood stove in the greenhouse, while my husband cooked beef stew – made by one of the farmers from their own locally-raised, grass-fed beef – over an open fire.

We dyed wooden eggs using all vegetable dyes, colors made from beets and carrots and all sorts of edible stuff. Once you start digging into the rituals surrounding it, there are so many inspiring, wacky and awesome ways to celebrate the turning of the seasons. People also took part in planting seeds, literally helping the farm grow.

My kids played in the mud all day, while occasionally complaining about not being at home playing video games. Eventually the complaints died down. Either they finally gave up or – I hope – forgot about the allure of technology for a couple of hours at least.

The air was crisp, the stew was hot, and the greenhouse smelled like warm dirt. It was a great day.

(For more, check out my post on Steemit)

Beef stew over an open fire

Dyeing wooden eggs in honor of Spring.

Taking a Nature Walk Scavenger Hunt

The Table in Early Spring

Spring Table nest with rock eggs

In New England, as it has everywhere else, cold, gray weather has long overstayed its appointed time. So in putting together a look for a table for a lunch event last week, it didn’t seem quite right to smother the table in pastel flowers. And since the geography of granite and rocky beaches, woods and quarries here on Cape Ann is so dominant anyway, I just let the geography win.

The color scheme of the table centerpiece was gray and white, with the green element provided by moss. And dirt. I can’t forget the dirt that made its way onto the table from underneath the moss. One guest more or less had her plate sitting in a trail of the stuff, but she was a very good sport about it. It was a bit like a more refined version of an early spring picnic in the woods.  The place cards were made from rounded, smooth beach stones that looked like speckled eggs, and snowdrops, made from crepe paper, poked from the moss, mimicking what was taking place outside.

Early Spring Table

It felt decadent, as one guest at the lunch put it, to sit down on a random Tuesday and have lunch together with a collection of creative, interesting people, most of whom didn’t really know the hosts — or each other. Food writer Heather Atwood hosted the meal at her painterly house, Howlets. She not only made the delicious meal, she provided the color with her early spring soup, made up primarily of root vegetables that she found at a nearby farmers’ market and cooked until they were just tender with a bit of bite. To see those beautiful colors collected in a bowl and set against so much gray and white was enough to make a winter-starved soul break out in song, like something from a medieval rite of spring.

The whole experience was so invigorating, from the company to the setting to the food, that, far from taking a post-meal nap, I felt like writing a book or trying my hand at oil painting after everyone gathered their coats and left. Not that I did either of those things. But I certainly felt like it, and that is as much as I could hope for from lunch on a random Tuesday afternoon in March.

For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; — Song of Solomon 2:11

Table From Above

Early Spring Table Details...

photo: Heather Atwood

photo: Heather Atwood